Meet “Bernie”: 4 Week Old Kitten Survives Fire

   You may have heard that on May 23rd, 2012 there was a devastating fire in Bethel Island (click here for news story) that burned down two homes. What you didn’t hear about were the colonies of feral cats who lost their homes and lives that night.

   The night of the fire, this little 4 week old kitten was brought to us on emergency by a neighbor of the fire struck area. At the time, he was named “Amazing Grace” because of his miraculous survival among the feral cat colonies. The woman who brought us to him told us the story of how he had a sibling a mother that often were found nesting together under a car. The woman believes that once the flames started, the mother kitten could only carry one kitten to safety; sadly it wasn’t this guy. He crawled out from under a car on his own while flames chased him and ended up pinned next to a fence where the kind woman came and rescued him. By then, “Amazing Grace” was in critical condition facing issues such as severely burned paw pads, whiskers burned off, eye irritation, melted fur, small burned patches and smoke in his lungs.


   Our registered veterinary technician, Barbara, was working the night “Amazing Grace” came in. The woman who rescued him from the flames was unable to keep him herself but she wanted to be sure he got the best of care, which is why she drove from Bethel Island all the way to us, in Walnut Creek. Barbara decided right then and there that she would take responsibility of the kitten and find him a furever home as soon as he recovered.

   Due to Barbara’s kindness, “Amazing Grace” (now “Bernie”) will heal and spend the rest of his life in a home where he is loved and will no longer need to sleep under cars and escape roaring flames. We would like to help Barbara and her dedication to saving animals in need, even when she isn’t sure how she is going to do it. Please help us, help Barbara, help Bernie, by making a small contribution towards his ongoing care at Encina Veterinary Hospital:


encinavet.chipin.com

    The best part is that Bernie has nuzzled his way into the heart of one of our other Registered Veterinary Technicians, Nicole, and has found his furever home already!


Bernie as of Tuesday May 29th, 2012
(you may notice that his pupils are large; that is due to the pain medication he is on because his paw pads are burned so badly that they constantly hurt, even with burn cream applied and wrapped)

Anesthesia Free Dental Cleanings

    Dental care is extremely important for our pets. As one of the ICU technicians at Encina Veterinary Hospital, I have personally seen the painful aftereffects of non-anesthetic dental cleanings performed by individuals (feed or pet stores, groomers) and I felt compelled to write about it (as well as some pushing and shoving [read: strong encouragement] from our blogger, Christina!) Although I am not one of the dental technicians, my heart breaks when someone brings in their pet with a tooth root abscess, or some other damage inflicted by an individual who “cleaned” their beloved pet’s teeth.

    Here at Encina Veterinary Hospital we recommend dental cleanings to our patients which require full anesthesia so that our Doctors and Technicians can do a safe and thorough job of fully examining, evaluating, cleaning and polishing your pet’s teeth. There are many places out there now that advertise non-anesthetic dental cleanings for very little money, who also convince/put the fear in pet owners that this is a safer technique than general anesthesia cleanings performed by licensed professionals like registered veterinary assistants and veterinarians. The problem lies in the fact that they may not be cleaning and polishing all the teeth properly. If teeth aren’t polished after scaling, bacteria can work its way deeper into the tooth cavity and create abscesses and many more (expensive) problems. It may seem like an easy and inexpensive alternative, but if not done correctly can be both expensive to your wallet, painful to your pet and even deadly.

    I know I have enough trouble trying to brush my dog’s teeth on the outside, never mind getting in all those nooks and crannies on the inside! And she certainly wouldn’t allow me to spend time scraping tartar off any of her back teeth and then polishing out the microscratches that the scraping leaves behind. The California Veterinary Medical Association (CVMA) opposed a bill (AB 2304) recently which would allow unlicensed individuals to scale pet’s teeth as long as it is with an unmotorized instrument without veterinary supervision. There are companies and websites out there touting the benefits of non-anesthetic cleaning, which are ill informed and send the wrong message to owners. They leave owners scared of veterinarians and general anesthesia, while subjecting your pets to harmful and scary improper dental cleanings. While cleanings here Encina Vet Hospital may be more expensive than the “cleanings” at your groomers, we have your pet’s best health and care in mind; we always treat your pets as if they are our own and we don’t lie to our clients to make a buck. Aren’t your pets worth doing what is right for them?

– Meg Davies, RVT


Here is an excerpt from Dr. Jill Christofferson’s advice article in the Contra Costa Times regarding anesthesia free dental cleanings:

When an animal is anesthetized, the area under the gum line can be properly cleaned using ultrasonic or sonic instruments and any pockets can be assessed and treated properly. The teeth are then polished. Dental X-rays and oral surgery can also be performed when needed. Many pet owners are frightened by anesthesia and think that having the teeth cleaned without it will be safer for their pet.

Anesthetic deaths do occur, and almost every veterinarian can tell of a death that occurred under their care. These deaths are rare, however, and the anesthetic agents currently used in veterinary medicine are considered very safe.

Animals who have had their teeth scaled without anesthesia can suffer from cuts to the gums, bruising of the skin due to excessive restraint, neck injuries, and even jaw fractures. I have known a few dogs who have had expensive and even life-threatening illnesses as a result of having their teeth cleaned in this manner.

The law in California states that performing dentistry on an animal constitutes the practice of veterinary medicine and needs to be done under the supervision of a veterinarian. The people performing anesthesia-free dental cleanings are not state-licensed or regulated and rarely work under a veterinarian’s supervision.

– Dr. Jill Christofferson