Archives for December 2011

Peanut the Miracle Cat!

Peanut's Baby Picture

It is said by many that cats have nine lives, as it would appear in the case of Peanut Matthews. Peanut, a very sweet seal point Siamese, has proven herself to be a survivor not once, but twice. Found by her human dad at St. Mary’s College (my alma mater) in August of 2010, she is the only kitten out of her litter of six to survive. Peanut came to us on the brink of death earlier this year, after her brother found her curled up against the back door of their house, crying, barely conscious. Dr. Johnson brought her back using life-saving measures that night, and Dr. Christine Fabregas recalls her story below:

Dr. Fabregas, attempting to get Peanut's blood pressure

“Peanut” Matthews, a 1 year old female-spayed Siamese cat, who was found by her owner at the age of 4 weeks. Peanut’s new family bottle feed her and nursed her to a healthy kitten. She was an indoor/outdoor kitten that loved to adventure through the neighborhood. On October 13, 2011, Peanut was presented to Encina Veterinary Hospital comatose, very low body temperature and blood pressure; neither was able to be registered. At this time the thought was that there was a traumatic event that occurred such as a hit by car. Her skin was bruised on her limbs and abdomen. She did not have any fluid in her chest or abdomen when scanned with the ultrasound. An IV catheter was placed and blood work was ran revealing a very low red blood cell count (8%) and her clotting factor time was out of range. Her limbs became rigid and she began to arrest. Emergency medicine was instituted with epinephrine and atropine injections. Her cardiac electrical conduction revealed ventricular fibrillation on ECG. The doctors defibrillated her chest and brought her back to life. She was given a blood and plasma transfusion, and Vitamin K1 injection for the possibility of a toxicity. She was intubated for oxygen therapy and protection of her airway. Blood was noticed within her airway tube and suctioned out. She began to regain more energy and her airway tube was removed. She was maintained in an oxygen cage, on IV fluid and medications for the next 24 hours. Her pupils were dilated and fixed, unsure if she has vision.

Peanut getting a blood transfusion, with Dr. Johnson & Barb's help

Peanut’s owner called later that evening stating the high likelihood of rat-bait toxicity found in their neighbor’s yard. We continued treatment for D-con poisoning. D-con is an over the counter rat poison, an anticoagulant. The mechanism of action is to cause bleeding, most commonly into the abdomen, chest, or subcutaneous. This also occurs in cats and dogs if they ingest the poison itself or if they ingest a rat that has ingested the poison. If you notice that rat bait has been ingested by your pet, it is recommended to bring them in to the veterinary hospital for assessment. This rat bait ingestion can be fatal if not treated.

Peanut in the Oxygen Cage

Peanut required multiple plasma transfusions to increase the amount of clotting factors in her blood to stop the bleeding. She had a few seizures over her first night in the hospital and the following day, which were treated and subsided. Medication was given to decrease the pressure around her brain. An IV catheter was placed in her jugular vein(neck vein) for ease of blood sampling and fluid administration. Peanut did not seem to be neurologically appropriate, because she was just laying on her side, not responsive to her surroundings. She would vocalize when pet, but was not completely aware. She was not eating or drinking on her own. A feeding tube was placed to increase her nutrition and prevent any potential liver disease. She was fed a/d slurry and administered oral medications through her feeding tube. Chest X-rays were taken and showed an area of a bruised lung. She began to have episodes of agitation to stimuli outside of her cage.

Peanut following the placement of a feeding tube

With time and intensive care, Peanut continued to improve everyday. She was noticed grooming herself, walking around in the cage, vocalizing,and more alert to her surroundings. She was slowly transitioned out of the oxygen cage into a regular cage. Her vision was still questionable, but her touch and light reflexes were present. Her temperature, blood pressure, and blood work were reaching normal values. She began to eat small amounts of food on her own. Her tube feedings were reduced prior to discharge from the hospital. Her bruising on her abdomen and limbs were greatly improved. Peanut was discharged from the hospital with instructions on proper feedings and administration of medication via the tube. She was responsive to her owners.

Peanut eating on her own!

On recheck examination, Peanut was active and alert with partial visual improvement. Her feeding tube was removed since she was eating well on own. She was grooming herself in the examination room in the arms of herloving owner. We wish Peanut and her family the best of luck in the future.”

Peanut feeling much better following a few days of intensive treatment

I spoke with Peanut’s dad recently, and he said that she is up to her old trick of hiding in the hallway and grabbing the legs of unsuspecting passerby.  Her vision has returned completely, all the better to find her targets. Peanut’s  spunky personality is still very much intact, and she has even learned not to use her claws when playing with her human family. We at Encina are very happy have been able to witness Peanut’s miracle recovery, and wish the best of health for her for the rest of her life!

Peanut's Unbreakable Spirit is Evident in Her Beautiful Eyes

Also, as a fun bonus, please check out Peanut taking her medication right out of her owner’s hand! Dr. Johnson and I have never seen a cat take medication so easily!  Peanut Taking Pills

 

Persians are Purrfection!

Persians are one of the most recognizable and popular cat breeds on the planet. Known for their calm, laid back demeanor and beautiful (yet high maintenance) coat, this cat breed is said to date back to the 1500s. The gene for long hair is recessive in cats, and researchers believe that it “appeared spontaneously in the cold mountain areas of Persia”. Queen Victoria of England owned two blue Persians, which made them quite desirable in the early 1900s. In North America, the Persian is considered to be one breed, regardless of color, however, in Britain each color of Persian is considered a separate breed.

The fact that Persians are brachycephalic (flat-faced) means that the breed is prone to breathing difficulties, as well as skin and eye issues. Polycystic kidney disease is also prevalent, in which the kidneys become enlarged as a result of cysts that grow in and around the organ.

One of Dr. Johnson’s more famous Persian patients is named Gabriella, known around cat shows as KIT’Z PAWS GABRIELLA BLISS. Gabi is the beautiful kitty you see in these pictures. I asked her mom Felicia to share their story:


“Before I started showing Gabbi I had never shown any cat.  I had gone to a few cat shows, but just as a spectator.  I bought Gabbi as a kitten  with
the intention of showing her, and ran into all kinds of health issues within the first few days of owning her. These health issues went on for about a good year,  however with the excellent  care of Dr. Roger Johnson, Shannon, and everyone at Encina, she bounced out of all that and is a wonderful pet and show Persian.  Some people that show believe in caging their show cats to keep the cats coat in show condition,  I am not one of
those , Gabbi has the run of the house with my other 3 cats.  Nobody thought she would be in the place she is now, which is in the Ribbons at the Shows! Gabbi loves to go to the shows, and she is just looking better and better.
I started showing her in August of 2011,  her first show she received her “Premier”   title, and four shows later in October she received her
“Grand Premier”   title . I am currently competing for a Regional win, then she will have a “Regional Winner” title.

Encina would like to wish Gabi and Felicia the best of luck in all of their future endeavors, on and off the show circuit!