Employee of the Month for June 2014: Krista!

As a Doctor’s Assistant on the Client Care Team, every day for Krista is filled to the max! “rooming patients, putting together estimates and invoices, dispensing medications, answering questions and client concerns, setting up appointments and scheduling surgeries, AND whatever else my doctor needs!” are just some of the tasks she does day in and day out since joining our team in July of 2011.

Nearly 2 years ago when Krista joined us, she says that Allison recruited her, “and I wanted to broaden my experiences in the veterinary field”. She attributes her success here to her “very supportive team” and “team leaders are very encouraging and help whenever needed.”

Although public speaking is hard for her she admits, she appreciates the ability to “learn something new every day” which she says is her favorite part of the job.

“I was surprised!” says Krista about her employee of the month for June. “My efforts don’t go unnoticed and I feel like my contributions are actually appreciated … Everything I have been through recently, everyone here is so helpful, everyone just wants me back to 100%.

Hanging out with friends, family; concerts and baseball games are a few of her favorite things to do when she isn’t here but lately she’s been building and fixing her fence that BB, her dog, continues to break through. “It’s so frustrating!”

Although she has only seen the movie once, she says the Snowman song from Frozen is the catchiest tune around right now that she can’t help but sing along too.

Given the opportunity to host a dinner party she immediately says she would invite Usher, along with Jay Sean and her grandfather who has passed away – “it would be very interesting!” she says with her classic laugh.

Employee of the Month: May 2014

Danielle Quintero, RVT
Patient Care Team

Over 6 years ago, Danielle (aka DQ)walked into Encina Veterinary Hospital and became a crucial part of our team. Her role as a Registered Veterinary Technician plays such an important part in our hospital – both to patients and to collegues.

Each day, DQ tends to our emergency patients as well as those in-patients who need around the clock care in our ICU unit. Inbetween ICU patients and emergency patients, DQ monitors anesthesia and vitals of our patients in surgery.

DQ decided to join the team at Encina 6 years ago for some very practical reasons: close to home, featured emergency and critical veterinary care and of course, we were hiring! She continues to stay and grow with us because she likes the “fast paced, multi tasking team based environment, the way we manage cases and the high quality veterinary medicine we provide.”

She admits the job isn’t always easy, as she can’t “save them all,” but she says her strong work ethic keeps her focused and successful. “I was honored, very shocked,” says DQ when she was told that she had won our Employee of the Month for May.

When DQ is not here at the hospital, she stays busy thanks to her 3 year old son AJ and trips to Monterey Bay’s beach. At home, you can catch her gardening (she’s got some roses she is particularly proud of), home improvement projects and Netflixing her new guilty pleasure Revenge.

DQ says the song that will never fail to make her sing along to is Gloria Gaynor’s, I Will Survive. Should she have a dinner party with 3 people dead or alive, her picks are: her father, Etta James and Chuck Berry – a party focused on her love for music.

Welcome Dr. Liz Milauskas!

We are very excited to announce the return of Dr. Liz Milauskas to Encina Veterinary Hospital as she will join our team of doctors as a full-time general practitioner starting NOW!

Dr. Milauskas was raised in southern California. Unsurprisingly to her friends and family, Dr. Milauskas pursued a career as a veterinarian after completing her undergraduate degree in Biological Sciences in 1994 from UC Davis. Following graduation, she moved to Dublin, Ireland where she attended veterinary school at University College, Dublin Ireland Upon graduating with a degree in veterinary medicine in 2000 she returned to the United States and began practicing veterinary medicine in Oregon for the next 8 years.

In 2008 to 2009, Dr. Milauskas returned to California and completed an internship at Encina Veterinary Hospital. In addition to completing the internship, Dr. Milauskas studied alternative therapies, such as acupuncture, and has integrated them with traditional veterinary medicine. Since completing a veterinarian acupuncture course at Colorado State University she has become a certified veterinary acupuncturist.

Dr. Milauskas is also certified in Penn Hip, which is a multi-faceted radiographic screening method for canine hip evaluation. This is the ideal way to radiographically evaluate canine hips for dysplasia and there are only a small percentage of veterinarians that are certified to perform this diagnostic test.

Dr. Milauskas is a member of the American Veterinary Medical Association, the California Veterinary Medical Association, the Oregon Veterinary Medical Association, and the International Veterinary Acupuncture Society.

On her days away from veterinary medicine she enjoys running, hiking, traveling, and spending time with her husband, their two Labradors (Kiely and Lily) and their French Bulldog (Max).

Employee of the Month: April 2014

Yesenia Flores
Patient Care Team

Yesenia is a technician and part of the Patient Care Team here at Encina Veterinary Hospital. Her responsibilities include: monitoring anesthesia for any patients in surgery, inpatient care for our hospitalized patients and outpatient care for those patients that drop by for just an hour or so.

Yesenia began here at Encina in July of 2013, when she had heard about us from a veterinarian in Colorado who recommended us to her as a place of employment. “The quality of medicine, a place that was top-notch and utilized their technicians to the fullest potential” was something Yesenia was specifically looking for when she came here – and she found it!

Yesenia attributes her success here in part to the people she works with every day. She says her co-workers are, “very nice, helpful, encourage learning and everyone meshes well together – from the doctors, to the staff up front and the technicians.” Her greatest challenge at work is facing the tough cases – “where we have tried everything and there is nothing more to do. We fall in love with our patients and they pass.”

Outside of Encina, she enjoys spending her time relaxing at home with her critters – including a turtle. Right now she’s got “Do You Want to Build a Snowman?” from the Frozen soundtrack stuck in her head. And if she were to have 3 people over for dinner – dead or alive – she would pick, “Pancho – my cat who has been lost for the last 2 months and my mom and dad – yes they’re alive, I live with them! I just love them so much.”

Cats and Hairballs: Normal or Not?

We’ve all heard (and probably have seen) that cats get hairballs which are literal balls of fur that are vomited up. But is this normal?

Yes and no – let us explain.

Cats are known for their grooming habits. It seems that when cats aren’t sleeping or being curious, they’re grooming themselves to perfection. And with all this meticulous grooming, it’s only natural and normal for a cat to occasionally have a hair ball or two every few months. The part when it becomes an issue is when the frequency of hairballs is more frequent then one or two every few months, which can be a symptom of an underlying condition.

One way to reduce the amount of fur your feline friend consumes is using a deshedding tool such as a brush or Furminator. These tools help remove hair that your pet may otherwise eat and vomit later.

If you’re seeking peace of mind an answers, the best thing is a trip to Encina Veterinary Hospital where one of our veterinarians can assess and treat your beloved feline, and get to the root of the problem.

Importance of Wellness Care

It seems less and less pet owners are bringing their pets in for wellness/annual exams and we’re hearing more and more of, “nothing is wrong”. The sad truth is that when something is wrong, it’s a little more difficult to treat because that something that is wrong, has grown and progressed since the “nothing is wrong” days.

Pets aren’t getting the regular care they need and that’s a problem because by the time some pets make it to Encina Veterinary Hospital, they have serious illnesses that could have been prevented with regular, routine veterinary care.

Annual exams, routine blood work, vaccines and dental cleanings all keep your beloved pet healthy and happy, longer. We LOVE celebrating normal and healthy and we think you should too! These routine protocols help prevent heart disease among many, which can lead to premature death for your pet. Chronic diseases and illnesses don’t need to evolve, spread and cause your pet harm if we catch it quickly in an annual exam, versus when pets begin showing signs.

Let us help in keeping your furkid healthy and happy by your side for as long as possible with an annual exam and routine blood work. We’re here for you always, open 24 hours, 7 days a week.

Dr. Stepita’s Behavior Tip

Adding a New Pet to the Family
    When considering adding a new pet to your family I highly recommend researching which species and/or breed best match your lifestyle and family situation. Your veterinarian is a great resource! Drs. Lynette and Ben Hart have studied breed and gender differences among cats and the information can be found in their new book, Your Ideal Cat. Interested in the dog version? The original study which was performed in the 1980’s is called The Perfect Puppy: How to Choose Your Dog by Its Behavior….. Look out for the updated version of this book which should be published soon (FYI- the Hart’s found similar information in the new dog study as they did when they performed the original study, but the new book will include more breeds).

Here are a few pieces of information found in these studies:
1. Female dogs are easier to housetrain than males
2. Terriers rank high in snapping at children
3. Bengal cats rank high in aggression and urinating outside of the litterbox

Meredith Stepita, DVM, Dipl. ACVB

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Izzy is currently up for adoption through Community Concern for Cats in Walnut Creek. Izzy is a sweet kitty, great with other cats and dogs, and settles in very quickly. She also is fine with loud noises like a hair dryer, the vacuum, etc. And she likes to lick! She can be silly and loves to play with other kitties. (click image for larger size)

PET HOLIDAY SAFETY TIPS

While the holidays are a great time to decorate and celebrate with loved ones, our furry family members seem to be up to mischief. Here are a few things to be aware of this holiday season:

EMERGENCY VET We’re open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week – including all major holidays. Don’t hesitate to call us with your pet concerns at any hour of any day because we are always here for you: 925-937-5000

PLANTS Did you know holly, mistletoe, and poinsettia plants are poisonous to dogs or cats? If you normally use these plants to decorate your home, they should be kept in an area your pet cannot reach.

DECORATIONS Whether your decorations may be ornaments, or cranberry or popcorn strings — they are like time bombs waiting to happen. These goodies are just too enticing and your pet will surely tug at them, knocking down your wonderfully decorated spruce.

CANDLES Burning candles should be placed on high shelves or mantels, out of your pet’s way — there’s no telling where a wagging tail may end up. Homes with fireplaces should use screens to avoid accidental burns.

WIRES To prevent any accidental electrocutions, any exposed indoor or outdoor wires should be taped to the wall or the sides of the house.

GIFT WRAPPING When gift wrapping, be sure to keep your pet away. Wrapping paper, string, plastic, or cloth could cause intestinal blockages. Scissors are another hazard, and they should be kept off floors or low tables.

How Dogs Became Our Best Friends!

Check out this adorable infographic from The Uncommon Dog!

Overcoming Nail Trimming Hurdles

Most dogs and cats do not enjoy having their paws handled, let alone their nails trimmed, but with a little bit of work you can change their emotional response to this procedure.

First, hold your pet in a position that is comfortable for nail trimming (for you and your pet) while feeding a high value treat. Use a treat that your dog or cat only receives at this time so he associates nail trimming with something he really likes. Start with a short amount of time (less than 30 seconds) and gradually work up to longer periods of time.

Next, feed the treat while you touch your dog’s foot. The key is to touch the foot only while your pet is interested and eating the special treat. When you stop touching his foot, the treat goes away. This is easier with 2 people.

Once he is comfortable with this progress to tapping his nail with the clippers while feeding the treat and finally clipping his nail while feeding the treat. Initially you will only be able to clip one nail at a time. Gradually work up to clipping more nails in one session.

Remember to only proceed to the next step when your dog or cat is calm, relaxed and eating treats. The whole process takes weeks to months. If your dog or cat becomes aggressive (barking, growling, lip lifting, hissing, snarling, snapping, biting), then consult your veterinarian or a veterinary behaviorist before proceeding.

Here’s a video:

Meredith Stepita, DVM, DACVB